In the living area of this Martha's Vineyard home, furnishings are awash in a sea of blues, but slight variations in tone and subtle patchwork motifs take the place of sharply contrasting patterns and hues. A patchwork rug from Nomadic Trading Company anchors the living area, furnished with linen sofas and a wingback chair by Cisco. The glass top on Groundwork's reclaimed-oak coffee table displays a collage of vintage art.
Paint is affordable, transformative, and easily applied by novice decorators. Use it to color walls, update flea market furnishings, refresh tired floors, and showcase a room's architectural features. Choose wall colors that further a mood (the deeper the tone, the cozier the feel) and that complement your finest furnishings and personal style preferences. 
Color stretches all the way up to the high rafters in this living room designed by Thomas Jayne and William Cullum. As you can see in the mirror, the color of these walls changes depending on the way the light hits it, shifting between sharp mint green and soft sea foam green. The red and blue work nicely, too, as the red is featured in the carpet, coffee table, and sofas, blending everything together beautifully. All together, the room feels traditional and formal, country chic and casual. To elongate your already tall ceilings, hang a pendant light high above the sitting area.
Like a luxury mountain resort, this rustic chic living room boasts sumptuous furnishings set within a comfortable, unpretentious backdrop. Medieval sconce lighting illuminates the interior while a generous stone fireplace provides a welcoming reprieve from the cold, with creamy whites and deep blues providing a soothing scheme to relax in. Wildlife scenes, as depicted in the mantle piece art, and multi-sized candles put the finishing touch on this eclectic but carefully curated space.
Leaning into the smallness of a space can actually be what makes it feel genuinely cozy and inviting. Keep seating close together and intimate, and choose a plush, soft rug, like the one in this space designed by 2LG Studio. This is especially well advised if you're decorating a small family room, where you'll want things to super welcoming and functional.
These free-form wood slab “canvases” are a striking way to display your favorite prints and portraits, all the while lending a decidedly Pacific Northwest touch to bright, open rooms and hallways. Suspended alone or in multiple rows, these wooden frame mounts work best on lighter walls, where the richness of the wood can truly stand out and draw the eye. Driftwood, glass floats, seashells, and found flea market treasures make the perfect companion pieces, with carefully crafted candles suggesting your personal gallery’s special place in the heart of your home.

Rustic doesn’t have to mean dark. In her family’s Texas ranch house, designer Lisa Hilderbrand created an airy living room with a rustic twist by installing a new stucco fireplace topped with a wood mantel and layering lots of “take-a-beating” materials such as wood-plank laminate flooring, leather furniture, seagrass rugs, and a stone-and-steel coffee table.
Imperfections are perfect for rustic living rooms. In fact, rough is one of the words used to define rustic. So when you incorporate elements into your rustic decor, celebrate any less-than-pristine aspects of the piece. This large hutch retains doors once stripped of almost all the paint but was never repainted. The resulting natural wood frames with specks of paint draw attention to the treasures displayed inside while exuding rustic charm.
As we've mentioned a few times already, a small space doesn't mean you can't have fun with color. So if you love incorporating pretty pastels or vivid brights but want to make sure your living room doesn't look chaotic, the trick is to stick to a tight color palette. Mixing patterns is also fair game, especially when done as masterfully as this cheerful room designed by Ellen Kavanaugh.
This homeowner bucked the “matchy, matchy” rule by placing different end tables and lamps on either side of the sofa in her living room. The mismatch works because, even though one table is a white Asian-inspired look and the other is a black step-like design, both tables are the same height. A sleek brass reading lamp pairs nicely with the simple white table, while a large silver-leaf table lamp fits with the more substantial black table.
This homeowner bucked the “matchy, matchy” rule by placing different end tables and lamps on either side of the sofa in her living room. The mismatch works because, even though one table is a white Asian-inspired look and the other is a black step-like design, both tables are the same height. A sleek brass reading lamp pairs nicely with the simple white table, while a large silver-leaf table lamp fits with the more substantial black table.
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