Designed by Redmond Aldrich Design, this living room manages to be unique and versatile, colorful and understated, approachable and impressive, all at once. That's thanks to the quirky, eclectic mix of frames, a light wood paneled wall, a classic carpet, and an unexpectedly colorful sofa. If you typically like to stick to more neutral tones at home but find yourself generally drawn to color, consider venturing out with a dusty rose, forest green, or navy sofa—they're the new neutrals.
This floor-to-ceilings fireplace in a living room designed by Leanne Ford is taking style notes from the best of both worlds: A classic mountain chalet and the Malibu coast. Whether there's snow falling or waves crashing right outside that window, we want to be curled up on that linen slip-covered chair. This living room is also a testament to the perks of working with what you have. The fireplace was given a new life with a makeshift mantle comprised of reclaimed wood and a fresh coat of white paint.
Wallpaper is one of those trends that just keeps on giving and giving. If you go with a classic chinoiserie wallpaper, you can do just about anything with it as your style changes over the year. This modern self portrait by Chuck Close is a bold contrast to the chinoiserie wallpaper (Iksel's Eastern Eden) behind it in this Miles Redd-designed home. The contrast doesn't stop there: Redd continued to venture beyond design convention by incorporating contrasting jewel tones and mixing modern furniture styles with antique pieces. Oh—and believe it or not, the lime green chair is from Ikea! Proof even the best designers love a good deal.
A hide rug and Edwardian boxer photographic prints lend a sly masculine charm to the casual refinery of this room’s interior layout, without overtly overpowering the more graceful elements. Clean lines and simple color schemes keep the tone cool and laid back, while eye-catching pieces such as the wooden lobster trap-like ceiling lamp and repurposed rolling coffee table, as well glass dome-covered plants, allow guests plenty to admire and inquire about.
Cover Your Floors: Changing your dull or drab floor tiles or carpeting is an extremely expensive move. If you are fed up with your old floor, then buying carpets and multi colored rugs and placing them strategically across your living room will give your living room floor a new lease of life and color at a minimal cost. You can choose from a wide range of floor coverings depending on your budget and the theme of your living room.

Banish the superfluous, stow the clutter, and rethink furniture arrangements to overhaul your living room without spending a dime. Get a pal to help you move furniture around until you have visually pleasing groupings that are conducive to conversing. Watch the video below to learn the basics of furniture arranging that will help you plan a no-fail arrangement.
Short on space but still devoted to rustic chic decor? Try a headboard-style coffee table like this multi-fitted piece, which frees up floor space without leaving you at a loss for where to store and display your belongings. Convenient woven baskets can be easily slid under the unit for additional storage options, while a sparse floor plan and clean white surfaces optimize your interior space. This living room piece is the perfect balance between practicality and artisan sensibility, and isn’t that what the rustic design philosophy is all about?

Here, 1" x 4" pine boards, spaced about a foot apart, offer the look of custom paneling at a fraction of the price. Curtains in narrow vertical stripes break up the wall's horizontal lines. Multi-stripe pillows in complementary hues band together to dress up a neutral sofa. A wide white stripe, applied to the armchair's center using fabric paint (available at craft stores), packs a graphic punch.
Designed by Redmond Aldrich Design, this living room manages to be unique and versatile, colorful and understated, approachable and impressive, all at once. That's thanks to the quirky, eclectic mix of frames, a light wood paneled wall, a classic carpet, and an unexpectedly colorful sofa. If you typically like to stick to more neutral tones at home but find yourself generally drawn to color, consider venturing out with a dusty rose, forest green, or navy sofa—they're the new neutrals.
So the interior didn't compete with views of the farm, the owner of this Alberta farmhouse opted for crisp white paint on the walls and ceiling, and blue draperies that complement the large stretch of sky outside the windows. Light pine floors with a single coat of whitewash allow the wood's natural grain to show without taking away from the room's airy feel.
×