Creating living room décor in a modernist vain is a practice in less being more. Utilizing neutral color schemes to accentuate contour lines, strong geometric shapes and asymmetrical designs are the hallmarks of modern furniture. Achieving the modern look relies heavily upon furniture selection as well as placement. Search Living Spaces’ selection of modern furniture to piece together your vision.
Banish the superfluous, stow the clutter, and rethink furniture arrangements to overhaul your living room without spending a dime. Get a pal to help you move furniture around until you have visually pleasing groupings that are conducive to conversing. Watch the video below to learn the basics of furniture arranging that will help you plan a no-fail arrangement.
Right White: Residential designer Jodi Macklin followed up by coating virtually every surface of the living room in crisp, clean white. The paneling, trim, and ceiling got Donald Kaufman Color Collection DKC #38, the walls got the slightly darker Donald Kaufman Color Collection DKC #51, and the floors got a hardworking Benjamin Moore enamel (Moore’s Latex Floor & Patio Enamel #122).
When perusing living room decoration ideas, remember that one of the most attractive qualities of rustic chic decor is the ability to experiment with many different patterns, textures, and era influences. A studious brown leather sofa can add an anchoring solidity to delicate French prints and carefully curated centerpieces, while a simple woven rug lends a breezy, lived-in feel. Don’t be afraid to mix up your fabric designs, as the more eclectic your throw pillow and textile range the better! Tip: sturdy wooden trays make ideal catchalls to display your personal treasures, and double as attractive centerpieces to build the character of the room on.
Surround yourself with aged natural materials and the result is pure rustic beauty. In this cozy window-wrapped sunroom, homeowner Ellen Allen combined a reclaimed wood planked ceiling and walls, an extended stone “baseboard,” and a brick floor to set the rustic scene. An unexpected Lucite table and lots of lush indoor plants and trees keep the room from feeling too dark and heavy.

Chippy and peel-y architectural salvage brings a living room instant age and texture. After all, you do find “rust” in “rustic.” The living room of this grain silo-turned-guest house features numerous reuses of rustic salvage, including weathered sheet metal siding, chippy wood window frames, and even an old Champagne shipping crate that homeowner Amy Kleinwachter topped with a grain sack cushion to make into a footstool.


If your living room has access to a ton of natural light, don't block it out with dark curtains. Let it pour in to make the space feel more airy and open. Even if you don't have large windows and tons of sunlight, choose lighter shades to maximize the light you do have. Semi-sheer shades like the ones in this living room designed by Barrie Benson will help, too.
Banish the superfluous, stow the clutter, and rethink furniture arrangements to overhaul your living room without spending a dime. Get a pal to help you move furniture around until you have visually pleasing groupings that are conducive to conversing. Watch the video below to learn the basics of furniture arranging that will help you plan a no-fail arrangement.
It’s not as much about where you put your furniture as it is about the types of pieces you choose. "In each room I design, I try to include at least one round piece, such as a coffee table, that people can walk around without bumping their knees," says interior designer Katie Rosenfeld. "I also add a few armchairs and a versatile piece like a garden stool that can be used as a stool to sit on or as a table for a drink."
When perusing living room decoration ideas, remember that one of the most attractive qualities of rustic chic decor is the ability to experiment with many different patterns, textures, and era influences. A studious brown leather sofa can add an anchoring solidity to delicate French prints and carefully curated centerpieces, while a simple woven rug lends a breezy, lived-in feel. Don’t be afraid to mix up your fabric designs, as the more eclectic your throw pillow and textile range the better! Tip: sturdy wooden trays make ideal catchalls to display your personal treasures, and double as attractive centerpieces to build the character of the room on.
A black marble fireplace strikes the perfect balance between edgy and timeless. It anchors this living room designed by Arent & Pyke, which get a contemporary lift from the jute rug, modern and bright artwork, and shapely table lamp. And because the armchairs are a classic silhouette, they'll last forever—you can reupholster them with different colors and prints throughout the years as your taste and style changes.
We’ve collected 50 rustic living room ideas featuring DIY decor, lovely vintage furnishings and more. Use the filters below to help you find the right rustic living room decor for you. With your idea in hand, you can begin designing your cozy rustic living room. You can even browse our home decor line to find customizable items like pillows, canvases and more.
Cape Cod ambiance is a rustic favorite in living room decoration ideas, and for good reason. The irresistible trademark blue and white nautical color schemes, coupled with plenty of ship planking-inspired wood, are given a genteel upgrade with tinkling chandeliers and furnishings to suit the modern family. Beloved books, antique findings, and objects of interest are attractively displayed to frame and neutralize more modern necessities such as televisions and reading lamps, while assorted candles and vase arrangements keep the atmosphere seamlessly refined.
Steven Gambrel, one of America's top-tier interior designers, recently had a chance to consider the question. Although he lives and often works in the most urbane precincts of Manhattan, Steven grew up in Virginia and still has ties there. When the owners of a Middleburg horse farm asked him to convert one of their barns into a place for large, casual parties and just hanging out and watching TV, he took it on with relish—his first barn, and on home turf.
It’s not as much about where you put your furniture as it is about the types of pieces you choose. "In each room I design, I try to include at least one round piece, such as a coffee table, that people can walk around without bumping their knees," says interior designer Katie Rosenfeld. "I also add a few armchairs and a versatile piece like a garden stool that can be used as a stool to sit on or as a table for a drink."
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