These free-form wood slab “canvases” are a striking way to display your favorite prints and portraits, all the while lending a decidedly Pacific Northwest touch to bright, open rooms and hallways. Suspended alone or in multiple rows, these wooden frame mounts work best on lighter walls, where the richness of the wood can truly stand out and draw the eye. Driftwood, glass floats, seashells, and found flea market treasures make the perfect companion pieces, with carefully crafted candles suggesting your personal gallery’s special place in the heart of your home.
Chippy and peel-y architectural salvage brings a living room instant age and texture. After all, you do find “rust” in “rustic.” The living room of this grain silo-turned-guest house features numerous reuses of rustic salvage, including weathered sheet metal siding, chippy wood window frames, and even an old Champagne shipping crate that homeowner Amy Kleinwachter topped with a grain sack cushion to make into a footstool.

Buy blank canvases that you can paint and place prominently above a mantel or sofa. Using paints in your favorite hues, brush on a variety of cool geometric shapes or simply splatter colors at random to compose contemporary compositions. Like something less abstract? Use the canvases as bases for painted images, stenciled motifs, or collages created from all sorts of crafting remnants.
Short on space but still devoted to rustic chic decor? Try a headboard-style coffee table like this multi-fitted piece, which frees up floor space without leaving you at a loss for where to store and display your belongings. Convenient woven baskets can be easily slid under the unit for additional storage options, while a sparse floor plan and clean white surfaces optimize your interior space. This living room piece is the perfect balance between practicality and artisan sensibility, and isn’t that what the rustic design philosophy is all about?
Thoughtful lighting choices go a long way in creating a rustic living room. For rugged appeal, look for fixtures that appear old and worn with a mix of natural materials with imperfections. This oversize strap globe fixture combines a timeless mix of primitive wood and metal to command attention, and the spherical shape softens the room's hard edges.
Aside from the adorable dogs (Jacob and Wylo) cuddled up on the armchair-meets-dog-bed, that gallery wall is the clear statement-maker in this living room designed by Philip Mitchell. Mix and match frames for a subtle nod of personality. And speaking of personal touches, consider hanging art that means something to you, whether it's your children's artwork, your own, or a portrait of your pets.
19. You can choose to use glass showcase according to the architecture and decoration style of the room. Imagine that you are using the most elegant decorative objects, trinkets or accessories in a fine elegant display case. It’s not a hall, I hear you say. It doesn’t matter from a single showcase, it’s good to make a little difference. What is important is the integrity of the overall design.

Materials that connect to the location are key to character building. Sisal hints at the marsh grasses in an elegant way and is also durable, easy to clean, and ideal for layering. The alligator skull speaks to the local wildlife, while palms in antique glass and fern-patterned pillows are additional nods to the room's Lowcountry vibe and provide a carefree polish.
This floor-to-ceilings fireplace in a living room designed by Leanne Ford is taking style notes from the best of both worlds: A classic mountain chalet and the Malibu coast. Whether there's snow falling or waves crashing right outside that window, we want to be curled up on that linen slip-covered chair. This living room is also a testament to the perks of working with what you have. The fireplace was given a new life with a makeshift mantle comprised of reclaimed wood and a fresh coat of white paint.
If Marie Antoinette moved to modern New York City this would most likely be her living room decorating style of choice. Undoubtedly feminine but unabashedly opulent, this rustic hybrid space is illuminated by a Versailles-worthy chandelier, with plush carpeting and faux fur throws epitomizing all the comforts the elite could crave. Stylish scroll work shelving and a solid wooden coffee table uphold the rustic end of the aesthetic while a silver pocket watch clock and garden accents add a refreshingly personal touch. Best of all the creamy white and smooth taupe tones open up and brighten the space, offering smaller interiors a chance to shine in their own right.

Create Your Own Art: One of the cheapest methods of decorating your room is by using art work and decorative pieces that you have created yourself. Even if you are not very artistic, you can easily put together a collage of pictures, leaves or dry flowers that will look appealing once it is framed. You can also frame interesting pieces of fabrics or cushion covers to create a tapestry like wall hanging.
Let’s answer what the color should be. Leave the clichés of your mind aside for color matching. First, choose your favorite color. Do not rush to select side colors and create a color palette. The best thing you can do here is to visually examine the sample visually. The world’s most beautiful and most beautiful decoration photos and examples are on the pinterest site, you can try to use.
Color stretches all the way up to the high rafters in this living room designed by Thomas Jayne and William Cullum. As you can see in the mirror, the color of these walls changes depending on the way the light hits it, shifting between sharp mint green and soft sea foam green. The red and blue work nicely, too, as the red is featured in the carpet, coffee table, and sofas, blending everything together beautifully. All together, the room feels traditional and formal, country chic and casual. To elongate your already tall ceilings, hang a pendant light high above the sitting area.
Designed by Redmond Aldrich Design, this living room manages to be unique and versatile, colorful and understated, approachable and impressive, all at once. That's thanks to the quirky, eclectic mix of frames, a light wood paneled wall, a classic carpet, and an unexpectedly colorful sofa. If you typically like to stick to more neutral tones at home but find yourself generally drawn to color, consider venturing out with a dusty rose, forest green, or navy sofa—they're the new neutrals.

Before you even start decorating your living room, remember where you are. If you live in a casual beach house, your design scheme is going to look very different from an urban industrial loft space, for instance. In this beach house by Arent & Pyke, the design team focused on channeling the tropical vibe of a coastal home through fun motifs and casual materials. Yet, they still maintained a look of sophistication through fresh upholstery, beautiful artwork, and a thoughtful layout. That being said, if you're a sucker for kitsch and wish you were always on island-time, add a hint of it with one statement piece, like a vintage Hawaiian-print rattan chair.
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