19. You can choose to use glass showcase according to the architecture and decoration style of the room. Imagine that you are using the most elegant decorative objects, trinkets or accessories in a fine elegant display case. It’s not a hall, I hear you say. It doesn’t matter from a single showcase, it’s good to make a little difference. What is important is the integrity of the overall design.
As we've mentioned a few times already, a small space doesn't mean you can't have fun with color. So if you love incorporating pretty pastels or vivid brights but want to make sure your living room doesn't look chaotic, the trick is to stick to a tight color palette. Mixing patterns is also fair game, especially when done as masterfully as this cheerful room designed by Ellen Kavanaugh.
This Leiper's Fork, Tennessee, home is bursting at the beams with ingenious ideas for all things rustic, reclaimed, and repurposed. In the living room, a panel of salvaged corrugated metal provides the perfect backdrop for the vintage Orley woodstove, while matte gray-black paint is a sophisticated canvas for a casual mix of framed and unframed family silhouettes, oil paintings, and a vintage deer mount. Slipcovers made from drop cloths (sold at home-improvement stores) make for a durable, family- and pet-friendly furniture covering.
Right White: Residential designer Jodi Macklin followed up by coating virtually every surface of the living room in crisp, clean white. The paneling, trim, and ceiling got Donald Kaufman Color Collection DKC #38, the walls got the slightly darker Donald Kaufman Color Collection DKC #51, and the floors got a hardworking Benjamin Moore enamel (Moore’s Latex Floor & Patio Enamel #122).

For all-over rustic living room warmth, you can't go wrong with a look that's as tried-and-true as a cozy cabin interior. This rustic decor achieves the look with horizontal pine tongue-and-groove boards that wrap the space in a golden hue. Exposed knots are part of the natural beauty, so don't be too picky when selecting boards. The imperfections make rustic decorating a low-stress endeavor.

Choosing a larger rug—even in a bold pattern—is a trick that makes a room feel bigger. Unlike smaller rugs, the large size doesn't visually break up the floor. This can also help anchor the space and give you a good staple piece to design the rest of the room around. Corner seating can also help you get more mileage out of less surface room for a longer traditional sofa.

Creating living room décor in a modernist vain is a practice in less being more. Utilizing neutral color schemes to accentuate contour lines, strong geometric shapes and asymmetrical designs are the hallmarks of modern furniture. Achieving the modern look relies heavily upon furniture selection as well as placement. Search Living Spaces’ selection of modern furniture to piece together your vision.


If your formal living room is also your family room, you want to make sure it strikes a balance between super comfortable and presentable. A cozy family room that cleans up nicely, if you will. A super soft sectional with plenty of space to spread out on movie night is a must, but choose one that also looks elegant. Then add fun, eye-catching lighting for an extra punch of fun, like the one in this Studio DB-designed room.
A hand-me-down buffet's original cherry finish felt a little formal for this Arizona ranch home, but with some matte chalk paint, the item took on a more casual look that set the tone for equally laid-back vintage pieces, from the leather luggage (that stores extra blankets) to a coffee table made from an antique mission door. A midcentury turquoise sofa adds a splash of happy color.
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